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Wheel of Time TV Series: Why Isn’t This a Thing?

Fantasy fans the world over already know about it and if you’re one of those people who came to great shows like Outlander and Game of Thrones through TV … you NEED to read the book series “Wheel of Time” by Robert Jordan & Brandon Sanderson because… well because it’s not on TV (yet.)  But why?  Let’s talk about it – click the read more for a spoiler free chat about why this SHOULD be a thing.

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3 Reasons for Reading Dystopian Fiction

Dystopian Fiction
Artistic Credit: http://elldevil.deviantart.com/art/Dystopia-Destroyed-City-357489610

People can be doggedly hard on dystopian fiction.  It’s weird how some people can like a thing a great deal until it becomes wildly popular and then somehow that popularity makes it suddenly unpalatable.  Instead of asking “why is dystopian fiction still popular” maybe we should talk about why it was to begin with.

Here’s three reasons why people are reading Dystopian Fiction.

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Barbie called Fat by girl & I’m happy.

Fat Barbie declares child and that's good

Time Magazine Article features girls as young as six mocking new Barbie as Fat.

Confession:  I hated the Jem doll when I first saw her because after years of playing with Barbie, I felt she was fat and therefore (despite her awesome hair which I loved and the epic clothing she had) she was ugly.  At the tender age of seven I think it was my cousin Kimmy who had a Jem doll and I thought about how thick she seemed compared to my barbie and how I’d never want one.

I was seven.  And no.  Jem dolls were NOT fat.  And yet… I had an image in my head about how dolls (and probably how women) should ideally look.

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Growing. Loss, Grief, & Foster Parenting

Miscarriage, Pregnancy, Loss, Grief, Mourning

Been a while since I blogged about me.  In fact, one of the last personal blogs I did was over at writing wenches (you can read it here: click here )  and it talks about our adventure in trying to sell our house, buying a new house, trying to get pregnant, a major health worry, resolving I wouldn’t get pregnant, and finally starting on our journey to foster/adopt.

Well, today I’m going to be real.  Gut tearing, exposing myself to the world, no holds barred kinda real.  And, as you can guess by the title and the image, I did get pregnant and I lost my baby.  Here was what I wrote on Facebook after our loss:

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Do Twitter and Blogs Really Drive Book Sales?

An interesting read about the effect of Twitter & Blogs on book sales.  Totally worth checking out.

Follow The Reader

We’ve all heard the old adage that “fifty percent of advertising works, we just don’t know which fiftty percent it is.” But does it apply to book chatter on Twitter and blogs? And if so, now that it’s becoming possible to measure just about everything through digital analysis, do we have to accept that it’s still true?

Acacia Tree of Live via Hyd-masti.com

Those were just a few of the questions in play at a recent #followreader discussion on Twitter, which yielded more than a few interesting facts and resources:

  • Many participants testified that they have purchased up to ten books in the last few months on the strength of recommendations on the social networking site.
  • Bloggers Anne Kingman and Michael Kindness, who are Random House sales reps by day, reported that more than 30% of their readers at Books on the Nightstand have bought three to five books based on recomendations on the site and 14% have bought six or more, according to the 252 respondents to…

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What is the best advice I’d give an author?

She reads out loud like I do too!😀 Love it. ♥

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

What is the best advice I’d give an author?

How many times have you thought about this question? Those of you who know me would remember I’d say “Never give up on your dreams.” But what else would I say?

Read work by other authors in your genre:

If you write children’s books, or fantasy, or romance, read some of those books. What did you like about the author’s style? Was the book well written and engaging?

Check your spelling and grammar:

It’s easy to think if you have spell check on your computer you might feel confident you don’t need to check your work for spelling errors. But before you get too excited think about words like two versus too, or form and from. It’s easy to overlook them because the computer won’t help you locate them.

Revise, revise and revise again:

Have you ever written a chapter and…

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Eating My Frog Daily

etf_full
“Eat a live frog first thing in the morning and nothing worse will happen to you the rest of the day.” – Mark Twain

Let’s get something clear to start… if writing is like eating a frog to you… it’s probably not “your thing” in life.  So, that said, writing isn’t really like eating a frog (as Mr. Twain refers to it above) but sometimes it can be as hard to do as eating a frog.

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10 Emotional Hurdles for the Newbie Writer #writers #amwriting

Dead on thoughts about the hurdles in becoming a writer. With Nanowrimo fast approaching now is a good time to become aware of the things which lay ahead of you aspiring writer!

BlondeWriteMore

SONY DSC

As a newbie writer I am constantly trying to jump over emotional hurdles in order to progress.

I am calling them hurdles  because if you don’t jump them you will end up falling down and hurting your writer self.

They are emotional  because each one has the potential to bring on tears / sobbing / a low mood / a spot of soul searching.

  1. Showcasing your writing to strangers. This was a tough one for me. Its such a scary thing to do when you first start out. Starting a writing blog helped me jump this emotional hurdle.
  2. Getting your first piece of negative feedback. Fall at this hurdle and you may never get back up. You have to overcome this and see the feedback as a learning. Some reviewers have never been on the ‘how to give feedback constructively’  training course so you have to put your emotions…

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4 Assumptions that Help Authors Fail

Thoughtful blog entry about writing and the ways in which many of us drop the ball when attempting to make that leap towards true success. A great read.

The Published Author

Writing

10 years ago, only one book out of every ten would succeed. And by succeed, I don’t mean bestseller. These books would earn out the advance for the author and probably get in a little more on the royalty, they would earn the publisher a small profit (yeah, not the kind of profit traditional publishing bashers say publishers make), but good enough to commission another book by the author. Occasionally, one of these “success stories” would break out and become a bestselling A-Lister. All in all, 7 or 8 out of every 10 published authors would fail. Today, with the ubiquitous self-publishing model, the number is higher it’s probably 97 or 98 out of hundred.

Yes. Only 2 or 3 out of every hundred novelists will see success. Not Patterson kind of success but “I can quit my day job” kind of success.

I am considering for this post …

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One Simple Tool To Improve Your Story

Relationship Map

A lovely relationship map (very funny btw) done by Noelle Stevenson, pick it up at: http://www.inprnt.com/gallery/gingerhaze/fellowship-relationship-map/

Relationships are at the heart of fiction and life.  They are what make our own lives have value and make a book worth reading.  Sometimes it can be tempting to remove road blocks such as misunderstandings and failure to see eye to eye on things from between your protagonist and his/her sidekicks, mentors, etc.

However, in doing so we really do a disservice to our stories because at the heart of all stories isn’t just relationships… there’s also conflict.  Our character’s problems and how we do or don’t deal with them are how we keep a story going and our readers reading.  Do you know what you call two characters without conflict of some kind?  “Happily Ever After” or “The End.”  That’s right, the story is done between them.

So, conflict between even the best of friends and lovers is a must… however, the conflict has to make sense in the context of their relationship.  How do you do that?  Well, even characters who are utterly in sync with each other emotionally will vary in how they relate to others.  This is where a tool from rpg storytelling comes in VERY handy.

A relationship map is like a mind mapping exercise where the lines between characters show you what one character thinks about the other.  For instance in a romance the two main characters might have arrows pointed at each other which read “I love you” but maybe they hero’s mother in law is where they differ.  The male character may “love and respect” his mother while the heroine may find her “annoying and catty.”  The difference in how these two see the same secondary character is RIFE with conflict for you to exploit as a storyteller.

Additionally, the importance of subtext can not be overstated here.  With a relationship map you can easily define emotional states and opinions that might not be spelled out for the reader but implied strongly.  Backstory that need not be revealed right away (or ever) that adds a layer of depth to your world and will keep readers engrossed in your setting, in love with your characters, and even developing story theories of their own.

Have you ever done a relationship map for your characters?  Comment below and tell me about it!

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